Alabamians could have wine, beer and liquor shipped to their homes under a new bill

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A new bill in the Legislature would allow Alabamians to have beer, wine and spirits delivered to their homes.

Presented by Senator Jabo Wagoner, Senate Bill 126 would allow licensed businesses to deliver sealed beer, wine and spirits from certain licensed retail establishments. Representative Gil Isbell introduces an accompanying bill in the House.

In order to receive a license, qualified businesses would have to file an application with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board and pay a non-refundable filing fee of $ 100 as well as a license fee of $ 1,000.

Restaurants could apply for a license to deliver alcohol. However, all alcohol deliveries must be accompanied by a meal.

The bill also lists a number of restrictions on alcohol deliveries, depending on the drink.

BEER: Beer, with the exception of draft beer, could be sold in containers of any size, as long as the total quantity delivered did not exceed 48 12-ounce containers of beer per customer in 24 hours.

DRAFT BEER: Draft beer could be sold according to council rules, as long as the total quantity delivered did not exceed 288 ounces per customer in a single 24-hour period. Draft beer could only be delivered to where it was permitted.

WINE: Wine could be sold in containers of any size, as long as the total quantity delivered did not exceed 4,500 milliliters or the equivalent of six 750 milliliter bottles of wine per customer in a single period of time. 24 hours.

MINDS: Licensed businesses may sell spirits in any size of bottle, as long as the total quantity sold does not exceed 1,750 milliliters per customer in a single 24-hour period. However, restaurants cannot deliver more than 375 milliliters of spirits per customer in a single 24-hour period.

Companies can use their employees or independent contractors to deliver alcohol. To deliver alcohol, you must be 21 years old and have a valid driver’s license. You must also undergo a background check and training program for certification.

SB 126 went 10 to 1 on the Senate Judiciary Committee.

This is not the first time that lawmakers have introduced a bill for home alcohol delivery. In 2019, Senator Andrew Jones introduced a bill that would allow beer and wine to ship direct to consumers in Alabama.

Last year, craft breweries across the state pushed for home delivery during the state-mandated stay-at-home order.

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