Columbus lending – Columbus Chamber http://columbus-chamber.org/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 20:08:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://columbus-chamber.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Columbus lending – Columbus Chamber http://columbus-chamber.org/ 32 32 Local Noise: Cincinnati Band Lung Releases Powerful New Album “Let It Be Gone” | Local music | Cincinnati https://columbus-chamber.org/local-noise-cincinnati-band-lung-releases-powerful-new-album-let-it-be-gone-local-music-cincinnati/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 15:56:49 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/local-noise-cincinnati-band-lung-releases-powerful-new-album-let-it-be-gone-local-music-cincinnati/ To help readers stay connected to the local Cincinnati music scene, CityBeat highlights album releases by local musicians in a monthly column called “Local Noise”. Click to enlarge Photo: Rachelle Caplan Kate Wakefield of Cincinnati Band Lung Lung may be the hardest working band in Cincinnati. The duo, consisting of cellist/singer Kate Wakefield and drummer […]]]>

To help readers stay connected to the local Cincinnati music scene, CityBeat highlights album releases by local musicians in a monthly column called “Local Noise”.

Click to enlarge

Photo: Rachelle Caplan

Kate Wakefield of Cincinnati Band Lung

Lung may be the hardest working band in Cincinnati. The duo, consisting of cellist/singer Kate Wakefield and drummer Daisy Caplan, frequently spend six months or more on tour, then spend the remaining months recording the songs they wrote on the road. In fact, the latest version of Lung, Drop itwas built in this exact way.

Like a well-manicured middle finger held high, Drop it is beautiful but more intense than any of Lung’s previous releases – an interesting trait considering it was recorded before their previous album, 2021 come clean now.

Registered lung Drop it just before the pandemic hit, but delays, including record label dragging feet and potential inclusion in an upcoming horror movie, held back its release. However, the world still needs a passionate challenge and Drop it fortuitously fills this slot.

With just drums and cello, Lung constantly mixes genres. In Drop it, elements of indie, classical, metal, punk and more freeze into an album that never lets the listener rest or become complacent. Wakefield’s classically trained operatic vocal styles dominate the auditory whirlwind, imparting both beauty and strength.

Caplan and Wakefield often have a lot to say about the state of the world in their music, and that hasn’t changed. Whereas Drop it has been unexpectedly delayed multiple times, its 2022 release seems surprisingly inspired and perfectly at home in today’s tumultuous climate. He couldn’t have come out at a better time.

City beat: This album was mostly written on the road, but then shelved for a very static time for the world. Did that crop the disc for you?

Marguerite Caplan: Yes absolutely. We finished mastering it the first time months before the pandemic… It was made in one world, started birthing in another world it didn’t fit in, and now it looks like it’s adapting again.

Kate Wakefield: We have registered [Let It Be Gone] and I’m done. Then, of course, the pandemic hit. We ended up writing online in the first two months of the pandemic and that’s when we wrote Come clean now, which is the record we released last year. And it was funny, even though it was out of commission, that record seemed way more appropriate for 2021 than Drop it did. When all the pieces have crumbled, to let [Let It Be Gone] being released for this tour felt appropriate again.

CC : Those two albums came together nicely, in a very weird way.

CC: Drop it feels rawer than come clean now. What prompted this feeling to be injected into the writing and recording of the album?

kW: I think our albums reflect wherever we are in the times that we’re writing it and recording it. When we recorded it, we were going back and forth on the road. It was also a strange time, even though the pandemic had not happened. As of 2016, it feels like things got really weird.

CC : I think about how the pandemic happened, there was a weird chorus of people saying, “We have to get back to where we are.” I think people forget that those weren’t good years and that there were a lot of things going on that weren’t great, that we weren’t happy about.

CC: There is an obvious marine thread throughout the album. What motivated the decision to explore this motif?

kW: I go through phases where I really get into certain visuals and metaphors, and I like to play with them. I really like the idea of ​​water and how it can be something that destroys and something that cleans. When it comes to writing lyrics, she’s very versatile in terms of what she can stand for.

CC : It fit well with the general theme of the era and also had some touchstones in mid-90s indie rock.

CC: You just released a video for “Rag Doll” [off of Let It Be Gone]. How was this experience?

kW: We have an artist in the band who has done all of our illustrations, all of our videos since we’ve been a band. Her name is Rachelle Caplan and it was her idea and we kind of went with it. We played at this beautiful place in Indianapolis called Healer; it’s this creative art space where you walk in and you’re in a whole different world. Rachelle had the idea to shoot a video in this space where as the video progresses we become a part of this space and it really fit the song perfectly. I love it, I love how it happened.

CC: For a band that spends tons of time on the road, how does it feel to be back after being forced out?

kW: When it all stopped, it felt like an identity crisis – it felt like a goal gone wrong. We were about to do 150, 200 shows a year for so long. So coming back to it, after taking a year and a half off, I felt grateful for more parts than before. I got to see him for the total gift he is; you experience so much in a short time when you tour. It was a throwback to what I loved, but also seeing it for the first time.

CC: During this trip, you are on tour with Daisy’s previous outfit, Foxy Shazam. How’s it feel to see Foxy perform from the side stage?

CC : Going into it, I had a lot of feelings or ideas of how it might turn out. The first night we played with them in Kansas, I gave it my all. I was just like, “Well, that’s an experience that not many people have ever had. It’s not an experience that I’ve ever had, where I’m going to watch my old band play songs that we’ve all written together , without me. And I’m just going to see what it is. The weird thing is that it was kind of fun. I wasn’t stressed about playing the songs properly or other people playing the songs correctly. It was just a fun time. It was surprising how much fun I had watching it.

CC: After touring throughout 2022, what’s next for Lung?

kW: There’s always more touring, but what excites me the most is that we’re sitting on 30-40 songs right now and writing more on the road. I’m excited to have January and February to check out this batch of songs and figure out how to create our next album.

Lung is currently touring with Mac Sabbath through 2022 with several upcoming shows across the United States. They also released a video for their new song “rag doll” and can be found @Lungtheband on all platforms. Drop it is available to stream now with a physical release scheduled for October 8 via Romanus Records.

Watch Lung’s new “Rag Doll” music video:

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Harris and Yellen focus on community finance at Freedman Forum https://columbus-chamber.org/harris-and-yellen-focus-on-community-finance-at-freedman-forum/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 19:10:48 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/harris-and-yellen-focus-on-community-finance-at-freedman-forum/ By FATIMA HUSSEIN – Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) – Vice President Kamala Harris and Secretary of the Treasury Janet Yellen plan to use this year’s Freedman’s Bank Forum to highlight how funds from the federal coronavirus pandemic relief program have helped support Black and minority-owned businesses. The Treasury Department said in a statement that “the […]]]>

By FATIMA HUSSEIN – Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) – Vice President Kamala Harris and Secretary of the Treasury Janet Yellen plan to use this year’s Freedman’s Bank Forum to highlight how funds from the federal coronavirus pandemic relief program have helped support Black and minority-owned businesses.

The Treasury Department said in a statement that “the importance of expanding the community finance system will be front and center” at the Oct. 4 forum. In 2015, then-Treasury Secretary Jack Lew launched the annual Freedman Conference to develop strategies to address persistent racial economic disparities.

About 96% of black-owned businesses are sole proprietorships and single-employee businesses. These companies have the hardest time finding financing and are often the first to suffer from economic downturns. They often turn to financial institutions for the underserved and other non-traditional lenders for micro-loans and grants.

People also read…

Earlier this month, the Treasury announced that it had disbursed approximately $8.28 billion in relief funds to 162 community financial institutions across the country through its emergency capital investment program.

The forum will include a panel on new support for community financial institutions, small businesses and low-wealth communities, “all with the goal of unlocking the economic potential of communities of color, rural areas and others who have experienced limits on economic opportunities”. says the department.

a february Government Accountability Office Report describes how various organizations could improve efforts to increase access to banking services for people who do not have access to bank accounts.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., the National Credit Union Administration and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency have all been identified for improvements.

Follow Treasury Department AP coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/us-department-of-the-treasury.

This story was first published on September 29, 2022. It was updated on September 30, 2022 to correct that the forum will be held on October 4 and not October 6.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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6 new twists on buy now/pay later loans | PaymentsSource https://columbus-chamber.org/6-new-twists-on-buy-now-pay-later-loans-paymentssource/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 16:31:42 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/6-new-twists-on-buy-now-pay-later-loans-paymentssource/ Buy now/pay later loans have exploded during the pandemic as fintechs BNPL introduced a turnkey way for consumers with little or no credit to shop online, creating a phenomenon that continues to have major repercussions. Some setbacks have arisen for major BNPL fintechs like To affirm and Klarna, which have suffered sharp stock market devaluations […]]]>

Buy now/pay later loans have exploded during the pandemic as fintechs BNPL introduced a turnkey way for consumers with little or no credit to shop online, creating a phenomenon that continues to have major repercussions.

Some setbacks have arisen for major BNPL fintechs like To affirm and Klarna, which have suffered sharp stock market devaluations in recent months in response to rising inflation, rising interest rates and heightened competition. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau also recently said it may develop guidelines for rein in BNPL lenders whose practices are mostly unregulated.

But the popularity of buy now/pay later loans is undeniable, as more than half of US consumers have tried a BNPL loan and more than 90% of users say they are satisfied with the concept, according to a survey of 2,200 adults. by Morning Consult on behalf of the Financial Technology Association between September 1-3, 2022.

Other industries – even traditional credit card issuers – have seen how well BNPL loans are resonating with consumers. Many are now trying to adapt the product to their business model, with some tweaks. From charitable donations to pet care, here are the areas where BNPL loans have sparked financial innovation.

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AP News Summary at 11:46 p.m. EDT https://columbus-chamber.org/ap-news-summary-at-1146-p-m-edt/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 03:46:07 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/ap-news-summary-at-1146-p-m-edt/ World Opinion Shifts Against Russia As Ukraine Worries Grow NEW YORK (AP) — The tide of international opinion appears to have turned decisively against Russia, as a number of non-aligned countries joined the United States and its allies in condemning the war. of Russia in Ukraine and its threats to the principles of international rules-based […]]]>

World Opinion Shifts Against Russia As Ukraine Worries Grow

NEW YORK (AP) — The tide of international opinion appears to have turned decisively against Russia, as a number of non-aligned countries joined the United States and its allies in condemning the war. of Russia in Ukraine and its threats to the principles of international rules-based order. In what many saw earlier this year as Western wishful thinking, much of the international community spoke out against the conflict in rare shows of unity at the often fractured United Nations. The coalescing condemnation grew when Russian President Vladimir Putin announced the mobilization of 300,000 more troops in Ukraine, signaling the unlikelihood of a quick end to the war and suggesting that nuclear weapons could be an option.

Russian men join exodus, fearful of being called up to fight in Ukraine

People also read…

ISTANBUL (AP) — Men of military age have joined an exodus from Russia on the second full day of a partial military mobilization. They filled planes and caused traffic jams at land borders in a desperate attempt to avoid being arrested for fighting in Ukraine. A 10-kilometre (6-mile) traffic jam has formed on a road in southern Russia leading to the land border with Georgia. This is according to Yandex Maps, a Russian online mapping service. Lines of cars at the border with Kazakhstan were so long that some people abandoned their vehicles and walked towards the border. Meanwhile, dozens of flights from Russia carried men to Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Serbia, among other destinations.

Dow plunges to 2022 low as recession fears rock global markets

Markets around the world sold off on growing signs of a weakening global economy, as central banks increased the pressure further with further interest rate hikes. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed at its lowest level since 2020 on Friday. The S&P 500 fell 1.7%, close to its 2022 low. Energy prices also closed sharply lower as traders worried about a possible recession. Treasury yields, which affect rates on mortgages and other types of loans, have held at multi-year highs. Yields on UK government bonds rose after the country’s new government announced a sweeping tax cut plan.

Amended autopsy: Black man died from sedation and restraint

DENVER (AP) — A black man died after an encounter with police in a suburb of Denver in 2019 because he was injected with a powerful sedative after being forcibly restrained. According to an amended autopsy report released Friday, Elijah McClain’s death is still listed as undetermined. The 23-year-old massage therapist was put in a neck hold and injected with ketamine after being arrested in Aurora for ‘suspicion’. The case gained renewed attention after the 2020 killing of George Floyd, leading to the indictment last year of three officers and two paramedics for manslaughter and reckless homicide in McClain’s death.

Fiona is rolling over northeastern Canada as a big, powerful storm

CAGUAS, Puerto Rico (AP) — Hurricane Fiona has developed into a post-tropical cyclone, but the meteorologist warns it could still bring hurricane-force winds, heavy rains and large waves to the region of Canada Atlantic. They say it has the potential to be one of the strongest storms in Canadian history. Fiona is expected to make landfall in Nova Scotia early Saturday. The Canadian Hurricane Center has issued a hurricane watch for large stretches of coastline in Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Fiona is expected to reach the region as a “large, powerful post-tropical cyclone with hurricane-force winds.” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says it’s going to be bad.

Cards’ Pujols hits 700th career home run, 4th to reach mark

LOS ANGELES (AP) — St. Louis Cardinals slugger Albert Pujols hit his 700th career home run, becoming the fourth player to hit the milestone in major league history. Pujols hit his second home run of the game, a three-run drive off Los Angeles Dodgers reliever Phil Bickford in the fourth inning. The ball landed in the front rows of the left-field clubhouse, the same spot homer No. 699 – a two-run shot – landed in the third inning against southpaw Andrew Heaney. Pujols has been in all five Cardinals runs and they lead the Dodgers 5-0.

Arizona judge: State can enforce near-total abortion ban

PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona judge has ruled the state can enforce a near-total ban on abortions that have been stalled for nearly 50 years. Friday’s decision by a Tucson judge came after the state’s Republican attorney general sought an order lifting an injunction issued shortly after the 1973 Roe v. Wade. Roe was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court in June. Friday’s decision means clinics in Arizona will likely stop offering abortions. The law was first enacted decades before Arizona became a state in 1912. The only exception is if the mother’s life is in danger. Another law that bans abortions after 15 weeks goes into effect on Saturday.

Pro-government rallies held in Iran amid mass protests

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Iranian counter-protesters have rallied across the country to show support for the authorities after nearly a week of protests and anti-government unrest. Thousands of people attended a rally in Tehran, where they waved Iranian flags, and similar demonstrations took place in other cities. Authorities say the gatherings are spontaneous. State television, meanwhile, suggested late Friday that the death toll from this week’s protests and clashes with security forces, sparked by the death of a young woman in the custody of vice police, could reaching 35. It’s the worst trouble in years, and internet access has been down for days. Many demonstrators call for the fall of the Islamic Republic.

Ohio Republican remains campaigning amid service scrutiny

HOLLAND, Ohio (AP) — Republican JR Majewski insisted Friday that he would stay in the running for a competitive congressional seat in northwest Ohio after The Associated Press reported earlier this week that he misrepresented key elements of his Air Force service. “I have often flown in combat zones, particularly in Afghanistan, and I have served my country with pride,” Majewski told a press conference. The comments came amid growing fallout for Majewski, who has repeatedly said he deployed to Afghanistan after the September 11 attacks but instead served six months loading and unloading planes while that he was based in Qatar, according to records obtained by the AP via an audience. request for records.

Roger Federer retires after teaming up with Nadal in last game

LONDON (AP) — Roger Federer ended his standout professional tennis career at age 41 with a doubles loss to longtime rival Rafael Nadal at the Laver Cup. Federer and Nadal teamed up for Team Europe and were beaten by Frances Tiafoe and Jack Sock of Team World 4-6, 7-6(2), 11-9 in London on Friday night. Federer is a 20-time Grand Slam champion who announced last week that this team event founded by his management company would be his last event before retirement. Then he clarified that Friday’s doubles outing would be his last match. He hadn’t competed anywhere since a quarter-final loss at Wimbledon in July 2021. Shortly after, the Swiss star underwent third surgery on his right knee.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Asian stocks follow Wall Street as Fed fights inflation https://columbus-chamber.org/asian-stocks-follow-wall-street-as-fed-fights-inflation/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 05:47:32 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/asian-stocks-follow-wall-street-as-fed-fights-inflation/ A currency trader watches monitors in the foreign exchange trading room at the KEB Hana Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022. Asian stock markets followed Wall Street lower on Thursday after the Federal Reserve announced another sharp hike in interest rates. to cool runaway inflation and raised its outlook for more. […]]]>

A currency trader watches monitors in the foreign exchange trading room at the KEB Hana Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022. Asian stock markets followed Wall Street lower on Thursday after the Federal Reserve announced another sharp hike in interest rates.  to cool runaway inflation and raised its outlook for more.  (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

A currency trader watches monitors in the foreign exchange trading room at the KEB Hana Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022. Asian stock markets followed Wall Street lower on Thursday after the Federal Reserve announced another sharp hike in interest rates. to cool runaway inflation and raised its outlook for more. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

PA

Asian stock markets followed Wall Street’s decline on Thursday after the Federal Reserve made another sharp hike in interest rates and raised its outlook to further calm runaway inflation.

Shanghai, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Sydney fell. Oil prices rose slightly.

The dollar hit nearly 145 Japanese yen after the Bank of Japan opted to keep its ultra-loose monetary policy unchanged, with its benchmark interest rate at minus 0.1%. Japan’s central bank has maintained such a policy for years, trying to stimulate business activity and counter deflation.

In the middle of the afternoon, the dollar was at 144.94 yen, against 143.46 yen on Wednesday evening. The euro fell to 98.29 cents from 99.09 cents.

Wall Street’s benchmark S&P 500 index fell 1.7% on Wednesday to a two-month low after the Fed raised its key rate by 0.75 percentage points, three times its usual margin. The Fed has said it expects this rate to be a full percentage point higher by the end of the year than it was three months ago.

“The Fed still managed to outpace the markets,” Fidelity International’s Anna Stupnytska said in a report. “Economic strength and a boiling labor market point to a limited trade-off – at least for now – between growth and inflation.”

The Shanghai Composite Index fell 0.3% to 3,108.43 and the Nikkei 225 in Tokyo slipped 0.6% to 27,153.83. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng fell 1.7% to 18,134.45.

South Korea’s Kospi fell 0.7% to 2,331.76 and India’s Sensex opened down 0.4% to 59,456.78.

New Zealand edged up less than 0.1% while Southeast Asian markets declined.

The Fed and central banks in Europe and Asia are raising rates to slow economic growth and calm inflation, which is at its highest in several decades.

Traders fear derailing global economic growth. Fed officials acknowledge the possibility that such aggressive rate hikes could lead to a recession, but say inflation needs to be brought under control. They indicate that the US labor market is relatively strong as evidence that the economy can tolerate higher borrowing costs.

“The Fed’s new economic projections underscore that it will tolerate a recession to bring inflation down,” EY Parthenon’s Gregory Daco said in a report.

The yield on the 2-year Treasury, or the difference between the market price and the payout if held to maturity, rose to 4.02% from 3.97% on Tuesday night. It was trading at its highest level since 2007.

The 10-year Treasury yield, which influences mortgage rates, fell to 3.52% from 3.56% on Tuesday evening.

The S&P 500 fell to 3,789.93. The Dow Jones fell 1.7% to 30,183.78 and the Nasdaq composite lost 1.8% to 11,220.19.

Wall Street’s major indexes are poised for their fifth weekly loss in six weeks.

Fed Chairman Jerome Powell underscored his determination to raise rates high enough to bring inflation back toward the central bank’s 2% target. Powell said the Fed had just started to hit that level with this most recent increase.

The central bank’s latest rate hike raised its benchmark rate, which affects many consumer and business loans, to a range of 3% to 3.25%, the highest level in 14 years, and in up from zero at the start of the year.

The Fed released a forecast known as the “dot plot” that showed it expects its benchmark rate to be 4.4% by the end of the year, one point higher than expected in June.

Consumer prices in the United States rose 8.3% in August. That was down from July’s 9.1% peak, but core inflation, which excludes volatility in food and energy prices to give a clearer picture of the trend, has eased. to 0.6% from the previous month, compared to an increase of 0.3% in July.

Central bankers in Britain, Switzerland and Norway are to say whether they will also hike rates again. Sweden surprised economists this week with a one-point rise.

The global economy was also shaken by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which drove up the prices of oil, wheat and other commodities.

In energy markets, benchmark U.S. crude gained 19 cents to $83.13 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract fell $1 to $82.94 on Wednesday. Brent crude, the price basis for international oil trade, advanced 20 cents to $90.03 a barrel in London. It was down 79 cents the previous session at $89.83.

This story was originally published September 22, 2022 1:47 a.m.

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Angel Olsen announces 2023 US tour dates https://columbus-chamber.org/angel-olsen-announces-2023-us-tour-dates/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/angel-olsen-announces-2023-us-tour-dates/ If Angel Olsen hadn’t come to your town when she brought Highligths on the road earlier this year, chances are she’ll be near you soon: the artist has just announced a new set of 2023 tour dates starting in January. Olsen’s 2023 tour is specifically hitting cities she has yet to play in support of […]]]>

If Angel Olsen hadn’t come to your town when she brought Highligths on the road earlier this year, chances are she’ll be near you soon: the artist has just announced a new set of 2023 tour dates starting in January.

Olsen’s 2023 tour is specifically hitting cities she has yet to play in support of her latest album, including New Orleans, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, and more. The trek begins Jan. 20 in Atlanta and ends Feb. 11 in Durham, North Carolina, with support from Erin Rae on all dates.

Check out all of Olsen’s upcoming shows below; tickets for the 2023 tour go on sale Friday, September 23 at 10:00 a.m. local time via ticket master.

Earlier this year, Olsen joined Sharon Van Etten and Julien Baker for “The Wild Hearts Tour”; Check out photos from one of the last shows of this tour here. In July, she performed “Big Time” on Kimmel, and in August she performed “All the Good Times” on fall on. Most recently, she teamed up with Sturgill Simpson for a new version of “Big Time.”

Earlier this summer, Olsen appeared on Kyle Meredith with…where she spoke about the time travel dreams that influenced Highligthsas good as twin peaks-meets-blurred area accompanying short that also tells the story of his parents’ death and his own coming out. Listen below.

2022-2023 Angel Olsen Tour Dates:
09/26 — Lisbon, PT @ Capitólio ^
09/27 — Lisbon, PT @ Capitólio ^
09/29 — Madrid, Spain @ La Riviera ^
30/09 — Barcelona, ​​ES @ Sala Apolo ^
10/01 — Lyon, FR @ L’Epicerie Moderne ^
02/10 — Zurich, CH @ Kaufleuten ^
04/10 — Munich, DE @ Strom ^
10/05 — Vienna, AT @ WUK ^
06/10 — Warsaw, PL @ Palladium ^
07/10 — Berlin, DE @ Huxleys ^
09/10 — Stockholm, SE @ Berns ^
10/10 — Oslo, NO @ Rockefeller ^
10/11 — Copenhagen, DK @ VEGA ^
10/13 — Cologne, DE @ Luxor ^
10/14 — Paris, FR @ Bataclan ^
10/15 — Leuven, BE @ Het Depot ^
10/16 — Amsterdam, Netherlands @ Paradiso ^
10/18 — London, UK @ O2 Academy Brixton ^
10/19 — Bath, UK @ The Forum ^
10/21 — Manchester, UK @ Albert Hall ^
10/22 — Edinburgh, UK @ Usher Hall ^
10/24 — Dublin, IE @ Vicar Street ^
01/20 – Atlanta, Georgia @ The Eastern #
01/21 – New Orleans, LA @ The Joy Theater #
01/23 – San Antonio, TX @ Tobin Center #
01/24 — Dallas, TX @ The Factory Studio #
01/25 – Oklahoma City, OK @ Tower Theater #
01/27 – Lawrence, KS @ Liberty Hall #
01/28 – St Louis, MO @ The Factory #
01/29 – Bloomington, IN @ The Bluebird #
01/31 – Columbus, OH @ Athenaeum Theater#
01/02 — Detroit, MI @ Majestic Theater #
02/02 – Cleveland, OH – Agora Theater #
03/02 — Pittsburgh, PA @ Mr Small’s Theater #
04/02 – Buffalo, NY @ Asbury Hall #
02/07 – New Haven, CT @ College Street Music Hall #
02/08 – Woodstock, NY @ Bearsville Theater #
02/09 — Baltimore, MD @ Baltimore Soundstage#
02/10 – Richmond, Virginia @ The National #
11/02 – Durham, NC @ Carolina Theater #

^ = with Tomberlin
# = with Erin Rae

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Today in History | Story https://columbus-chamber.org/today-in-history-story/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 21:26:00 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/today-in-history-story/ Today is Monday, September 19, the 262nd day of 2022. There are 103 days left in the year. Today’s highlight in the story: On September 19, 1995, The New York Times and The Washington Post published Unabomber Ted Kaczynski’s (kah-ZIHN’-skee) manifesto, which proved instrumental in identifying and capturing him. To this date : In 1796, […]]]>

Today is Monday, September 19, the 262nd day of 2022. There are 103 days left in the year.

Today’s highlight in the story:

On September 19, 1995, The New York Times and The Washington Post published Unabomber Ted Kaczynski’s (kah-ZIHN’-skee) manifesto, which proved instrumental in identifying and capturing him.

To this date :

In 1796, President George Washington’s farewell address was published. In it, America’s first chief executive advised, “Observe good faith and justice toward all nations. Cultivate peace and harmony with all.”

In 1881, the 20th President of the United States, James A. Garfield, died 2½ months after being shot by Charles Guiteau; Chester Alan Arthur became president.

In 1955, President Juan Peron of Argentina was ousted after an army and navy revolt.

In 1957, the United States conducted its first confined underground nuclear test, codenamed “Rainier”, in the Nevada desert.

In 1970, the show “Mary Tyler Moore” debuted on CBS-TV.

In 1985, the Mexico City area was hit by a devastating earthquake that killed at least 9,500 people.

In 1986, federal health officials announced that the experimental drug AZT would be made available to thousands of AIDS patients.

In 1996, IBM announced that it would extend health benefits to the partners of its gay employees.

In 2001, the Pentagon ordered dozens of advanced aircraft to the Persian Gulf region as the time for military retaliation for the deadly September 11 terrorist attacks approached.

In 2004, Hu Jintao (hoo jin-tow) became China’s undisputed leader with the departure of former President Jiang Zemin (jahng zuh-MEEN’) from his highest military post.

In 2008, struggling to avert financial catastrophe, the Bush administration introduced a sweeping bailout calling for the takeover of half a trillion dollars or more in worthless mortgages and other bad debts held by shaky institutions. Relieved investors sent stocks soaring on Wall Street and around the world.

In 2020, President Donald Trump urged the Republican-led Senate to “without delay” consider its next nomination to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just six weeks before the election. .

Ten years ago, members of Congress presented the Congressional Gold Medal to Myanmar Democratic leader Aung San Suu Kyi (ahng sahn soo chee) at a ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda. The Justice Department’s internal watchdog has criticized the agency’s handling of an investigation into Arizona gun trafficking that resulted in the discovery of hundreds of weapons at crime scenes across the United States. United and Mexico; the inspector general’s report referred more than a dozen people to possible disciplinary action for their roles in Operation Fast and Furious.

Five years ago: In a speech to the United Nations General Assembly, President Donald Trump vowed to “totally destroy North Korea” if the United States were to be forced to defend itself or its allies against the North’s nuclear weapons program. A 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck central Mexico, killing more than 360 people and causing the complete collapse of more than three dozen buildings in Mexico City. Hurricane Maria headed toward Puerto Rico after causing extensive damage to the small Caribbean island of Dominica. Former middleweight champion Jake LaMotta, portrayed by Robert De Niro in the movie ‘Raging Bull’, has died aged 95.

A year ago, U.S. authorities airlifted Haitians who had camped in a Texas border town back to their home country and tried to block others from crossing the border from Mexico. Members of the Afghanistan women’s national soccer team, aged 14 to 16, who had been trying to leave Afghanistan since the US withdrawal a few weeks earlier, boarded with their families on a charter flight to Portugal, where they had been granted asylum. The streaming services picked up three big Emmy wins, as Netflix’s ‘The Crown’ won Best Drama Series, Apple TV+’s ‘Ted Lasso’ was named Best Comedy Series and ‘The Queen’s Gambit’, too. on Netflix, won best series limited series.

Today’s birthdays: Actress Rosemary Harris turns 95. Actor David McCallum is 89 years old. Singer-songwriter Paul Williams is 82 years old. Singer Bill Medley is 82 years old. Singer Sylvia Tyson (Ian and Sylvia) is 82 years old. R&B singer Freda Payne is 80 years old. Retired professional golfer Jane Blalock is 77 years old. Singer David Bromberg is 77 years old. Actor Randolph Mantooth is 77 years old. Singer and rock musician Lol Creme (10cc) is 75 years old. Former NFL running back Larry Brown is 75. Actor Jeremy Irons is 74 years old. Actor Twiggy Lawson is 73 years old. TV personality Joan Lunden is 72 years old. Singer-producer Daniel Lanois (lan-WAH’) is 71 years old. Actor Scott Colomby is 70 years old. Musician-producer Nile Rodgers is 70 years old. Singer-actor Rex Smith is 67 years old. Rock singer Lita Ford is 64 years old. Actor Kevin Hooks is 64 years old. Actor Carolyn McCormick is 63 years old. Celebrity chef Mario Batali is 62 years old. Actor-comedian Cheri Oteri is 60 years old. Country singer Jeff Bates is 59. Country singer Trisha Yearwood is 58. News anchor Soledad O’Brien is 56. Celebrity chef Michael Symon is 53 years old. Actor Victor Williams is 52 years old. Actor Sanaa Lathan (suh-NAH’ LAY’-thun) is 51 years old. Actress Stephanie J. Block is 50 years old. Rock singer A. Jay Popoff (Lit) is 49 years old. “Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon is 48 years old. TV personality Carter Oosterhouse is 46 years old. Folk-rock singer-musicians Sara and Tegan (TEE’-gan) Quin are 42 years old. Actor Columbus Short is 40 years old. Rapper Eamon is 39 years old. Actor Kevin Zegers is 38 years old. Actor Danielle Panabaker is 35 years old.

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Wells Fargo to pay $94 million to settle mortgage forbearance lawsuit https://columbus-chamber.org/wells-fargo-to-pay-94-million-to-settle-mortgage-forbearance-lawsuit/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 15:04:37 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/wells-fargo-to-pay-94-million-to-settle-mortgage-forbearance-lawsuit/ Wells Fargo will pay $94 million to settle a class action lawsuit that argued it sent more than 200,000 mortgage borrowers into forbearance during the pandemic illegally and without their consent. The plaintiffs argued that the San Francisco-based bank granted forbearances to customers who inquired about their mortgages or expressed difficulty, but did not explicitly […]]]>

Wells Fargo will pay $94 million to settle a class action lawsuit that argued it sent more than 200,000 mortgage borrowers into forbearance during the pandemic illegally and without their consent.

The plaintiffs argued that the San Francisco-based bank granted forbearances to customers who inquired about their mortgages or expressed difficulty, but did not explicitly request forbearance, Reuters reported this week.

Wells Fargo’s decision hurt borrowers’ credit scores, making it harder for them to refinance their mortgages when rates were at historic lows. Borrowers said Wells Fargo’s actions also violated the CARES Act.

Wells Fargo denied any wrongdoing in its Sept. 9 settlement, which was filed last week in federal court in Columbus, Ohio and requires a judge’s approval.

The lawsuit, which covers is known as “Echard v. Wells Fargo Bank” and includes more than 212,000 loans, likely played a role in Wells Fargo’s recent decision to pull out of mortgages.

On Tuesday, Chief Financial Officer Mike Santomassimo said the company was content to lose ground in mortgage originations and was “really focused on our consumer and wealthy customers.” He added that maintenance activity would decrease over time.

Earlier this year, CEO Charlie Scharf cited regulatory challenges and lending standards for loan compliance as a major reason for shrinking his mortgage footprint.

“We basically process applications according to the guidelines that the GSEs tell us we should,” Scharf said. “When these produce results, people like them, we get kudos for them. If they don’t like them, we’re accountable, even if we’re just following other people’s underwriting guidelines.

Scharf also argued that custodian banks are held to higher standards than non-bank mortgage lenders.

“It’s very different today to run a mortgage business inside the bank than it was 15 years ago, and I think it is that way,” he said. “It forces you to sit down and say, ‘What does this mean? What size do you want to be? Where is this located? »

Wells Fargo has also grappled with a series of controversies related to minority mortgages as well as its hiring practices. In March, Bloomberg reported that Wells Fargo in 2020 rejected more than half of refinancing applications from black homeowners. The bank’s 47% approval rating for black customers was the lowest among major lenders, according to data from the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA). His approval rating of white candidates for refis was 72% in 2020.

Wells Fargo has denied any wrongdoing and said its underwriting practices are applied consistently regardless of a customer’s race or ethnicity.

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Asian stocks mixed after wobbly gains on Wall St https://columbus-chamber.org/asian-stocks-mixed-after-wobbly-gains-on-wall-st/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 06:59:31 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/asian-stocks-mixed-after-wobbly-gains-on-wall-st/ A currency trader looks at computer monitors near screens at a foreign exchange trading floor in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022. Stocks were mostly higher in Asia on Thursday after a shaky trading day generated modest gains on Wall Street. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) Ahn Young Joon PA Stocks were mixed in Asia on […]]]>

A currency trader looks at computer monitors near screens at a foreign exchange trading floor in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022. Stocks were mostly higher in Asia on Thursday after a shaky trading day generated modest gains on Wall Street.  (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

A currency trader looks at computer monitors near screens at a foreign exchange trading floor in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022. Stocks were mostly higher in Asia on Thursday after a shaky trading day generated modest gains on Wall Street. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

PA

Stocks were mixed in Asia on Thursday after a shaky trading day generated modest gains on Wall Street.

US futures barely changed as oil prices fell.

The Chinese central bank left its key rate unchanged. While other major economies are raising rates to calm inflation, China’s economy is slowing and price increases are muted.

The Shanghai Composite index lost 1.2% to 3,199.24, while Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index rose 0.3% to 18,904.42.

Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 index gained 0.2% to 27,875.91. Japan posted a record trade deficit for the month of August, due to high import costs for energy and other raw materials and a weak yen.

But analysts said they expect a rebalancing in the coming months.

“Motor vehicle production should continue to normalize as supply chain disruptions ease, while commodity price growth has slowed further,” Capital Economics’ Darren Tay said in a comment.

Seoul’s Kospi fell 0.4% to 2,401.83, while Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 gained 0.2% to 6,842.90.

Trading was tentative in New York on Wednesday, a day after the market’s worst fall in two years was triggered by fears that higher interest rates could trigger a recession.

A wholesale-level inflation report showed prices were still rising rapidly, with pressures building up below the surface, even as headline inflation slowed. He echoed a consumer inflation report on Tuesday, which raised expectations for interest rate hikes and triggered a rout for markets.

The S&P 500 added 0.3% to 3,946.01, while the Dow Jones rose slightly 0.1% to 31,135.09. The Nasdaq gained 0.7% to 11,719.68 and the Russell 2000 gained 0.4% to close at 1,838.46.

Traders now see a one-in-four chance the Fed could raise its benchmark rate by a full percentage point next week, four times more than usual, according to the CME Group. A day earlier, it was closer to a one in three chance. The site puts the likelihood of a three-quarters percentage point increase at 76%, up from 69% on Tuesday.

The central bank has already raised its benchmark interest rate four times this year, the last two increases by three-quarters of a percentage point.

The Fed is taking aggressive interest rate action to try to quell the highest inflation in four decades. Tuesday’s high price report jolted the market with signs that inflation is entering a more stubborn phase that could force an already resolute Fed to get more aggressive.

Wall Street is particularly concerned that rate hikes will slow the economy too much and push it into a recession. The Fed is trying to avoid this outcome, but the latest inflation reports suggest this is becoming a more difficult task.

The US economy as a whole has slowed, but consumers have remained resilient and the labor market remains strong. Wall Street will get another update on the latest impact of inflation on spending when the government releases its August retail sales report on Thursday.

The market is also watching US-China tensions and the war in Ukraine, as trade and government officials brace for the possibility of a nationwide railroad strike later this week that could cripple a supply chain. already disturbed.

The railroads have already begun to cut shipments of hazardous materials and have announced plans to stop transporting refrigerated goods before Friday’s strike deadline. Companies that rely on Norfolk Southern, Union Pacific, BNSF, CSX, Kansas City Southern and other railroads to deliver raw materials and finished goods are planning for the worst.

Union Pacific fell 3.7% and Norfolk Southern 2.2%.

Biden administration officials are scrambling to come up with a plan to keep goods moving if the railroads are closed. The White House is also pressuring the two sides to settle their differences, and a growing number of business groups are pressuring Congress to be prepared to step in and block a strike if they can’t reach a settlement. OK.

In other trading Thursday, benchmark U.S. crude oil was unchanged at $88.48 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It jumped $1.17 on Wednesday.

Brent crude, the pricing basis for international trade, slipped 24 cents to $93.86 a barrel.

The dollar fell from 143.16 Japanese yen to 143.69 yen on Wednesday evening. The euro weakened to 99.63 cents from 99.77 cents.

This story was originally published September 15, 2022 2:59 a.m.

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Cheaper gasoline likely dampened high US inflation for a second month https://columbus-chamber.org/cheaper-gasoline-likely-dampened-high-us-inflation-for-a-second-month/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 04:10:29 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/cheaper-gasoline-likely-dampened-high-us-inflation-for-a-second-month/ FILE – A driver delivers 8,500 gallons of gasoline to an ARCO gas station in Riverside, Calif., Saturday, May 28, 2022. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File) Damien Dovarganes PA WASHINGTON A sign that the painful inflation of the past 18 months may be gradually easing could come on Tuesday, when the government is expected to signal […]]]>

FILE - A driver delivers 8,500 gallons of gasoline to an ARCO gas station in Riverside, Calif., Saturday, May 28, 2022. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

FILE – A driver delivers 8,500 gallons of gasoline to an ARCO gas station in Riverside, Calif., Saturday, May 28, 2022. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

PA

A sign that the painful inflation of the past 18 months may be gradually easing could come on Tuesday, when the government is expected to signal that the acceleration in US prices slowed in August from a year ago for a second straight month.

Economists predict the report will show prices jumped 8.1% from 12 months earlier, from a four-decade high of 9.1% in June and 8.5% in July, according to the provider of FactSet data. Sharply lower gasoline prices are behind much of the decline, along with the costs of used cars, plane tickets and clothing.

On a monthly basis – figures that the Federal Reserve, the agency responsible for fighting inflation, is watching more closely – consumer prices are expected to have fallen 0.1% in August. It would be the first outright decline in month-on-month inflation since May 2020 and would follow a flat reading in July.

Inflation has pushed up families’ grocery bills, rents and utility costs, among many other expenses, inflicting hardship on households and worsening the economy’s sluggishness despite strong job growth and historically low unemployment.

Still, signs that inflation may have peaked could bolster Democrats’ midterm election prospects and may have already contributed to slightly higher public approval ratings for President Joe Biden. In his speeches, Biden has generally stopped referring to the impact of high prices on family budgets. Instead, he pointed to his administration’s recent legislative achievements, including a law signed into law last month aimed at reducing pharmaceutical prices and tackling climate change.

Still, Republicans blame Biden’s $1.9 trillion financial rescue package, passed in March 2021, for contributing to higher prices. The legislation included a third stimulus check and improved unemployment benefits, bolstering consumers’ ability to spend.

Many mainstream economists generally agree, though they also blame supply chains, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and widespread shortages of items such as semiconductors for fueling inflation. . In recent months, however, supply chain safeguards have eased significantly, as have chip shortages. Oil prices fell to around $88 a barrel from a high of $123 in March.

The average cost of a gallon of gasoline fell to $3.72 nationwide on Monday, from just over $5 in mid-June. And many companies are reporting signs that supply backlogs and inflation are beginning to fade.

Elaine Buckberg, chief economist at General Motors, said the pandemic disruptions to overseas semiconductor production, which reduced automotive production, “have largely dissipated and we are now in a much better position.” . Overall, supply chain disruptions, she said, have improved by about 80% from the worst days of the pandemic.

Grocery prices have been a particular sore point for many families. Over the past year, prices for meat, milk, and fruit and vegetables have soared in double digits. But executives at Kroger, the nation’s largest grocery chain, said lower prices for agricultural commodities like wheat and corn could slow rising food costs this year.

“We expect there to be some inflation flattening in the second half of the year,” Kroger chief financial officer Gary Millerchip told investors last week.

Still, despite signs of slowing inflation, the Fed is expected to impose another substantial hike in its benchmark short-term interest rate at its meeting next week. Most analysts expect policymakers to report a third consecutive three-quarter point hike, within a range of 3% to 3.25%.

Rapid Fed rate increases – the fastest since the early 1980s – typically drive up the costs of mortgages, auto loans and business loans, in an effort to slow growth and reduce the inflation. The average 30-year mortgage rate jumped to nearly 5.9% last week, according to mortgage buyer Freddie Mac, the highest figure in nearly 14 years.

Chairman Jerome Powell said the Fed will need to see several months of low inflation rates suggesting price increases fall back toward its 2% target before it can suspend its rate hikes.

The central bank is also closely tracking prices which exclude the volatile food and energy categories. So-called “core” inflation has also fallen from its peak, although it is expected to rise to 6.1% in August compared to a year ago, against 5.9% in July. On a monthly basis, economists expect core prices rose 0.4% in August – double what the Fed would prefer – from 0.3% in July.

Even though inflation has peaked, most economists don’t expect it to return to the Fed’s 2% target for at least two years, if not longer. Wages continue to rise at a healthy pace – before adjusting to inflation – which has increased demand for apartments as more and more people move on their own. A shortage of available housing has also forced more people to continue renting, intensifying competition for apartments.

Rising rents and more expensive services, such as medical care, are also keeping inflation high.

This story was originally published September 13, 2022 12:10 a.m.

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