Ohio lending – Columbus Chamber http://columbus-chamber.org/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 07:34:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://columbus-chamber.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Ohio lending – Columbus Chamber http://columbus-chamber.org/ 32 32 Who is FDIC President Jelena McWilliams and is she resigning? https://columbus-chamber.org/who-is-fdic-president-jelena-mcwilliams-and-is-she-resigning/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 17:21:00 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/who-is-fdic-president-jelena-mcwilliams-and-is-she-resigning/ JELENA McWilliams may have served under both the Trump and Biden administrations. She announced that she would resign as head of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation effective February 4, 2022. 2 Jelena McWilliams is Head of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Who is FDIC President Jelena McWilliams? Born July 28, 1973, Jelena McWilliams is originally […]]]>

JELENA McWilliams may have served under both the Trump and Biden administrations.

She announced that she would resign as head of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation effective February 4, 2022.

2

Jelena McWilliams is Head of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

Who is FDIC President Jelena McWilliams?

Born July 28, 1973, Jelena McWilliams is originally from Belgrade, Serbia.

However, she moved to the United States at the age of 18 as part of a high school exchange program.

On June 5, 2018, she was sworn in as the 21st President of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) under the Trump administration.

After working as a lawyer on the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve from 2007 to 2010, she held senior positions.

She also served as Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of Fifth Third Bank in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Does President Jelena McWilliams Resign?

In a surprising announcement on Friday, December 31, 2021, McWilliams announced that she would step down from her current position as President of the FDIC on February 4, 2022.

It is not known why she is resigning from her post. However, she released a statement, which did not include a specific reason for her resignation.

She said: “Throughout my tenure, the agency has focused on its core mission of maintaining and building confidence in our banking system while promoting innovation, strengthening financial inclusion, improving transparency and supporting community banks and minority deposit-taking institutions, including through the creation of the Mission-Driven Bank Fund.

She added: “Today, banks continue to maintain strong capital and liquidity levels to support lending and protect against potential losses.”

Jelena McWilliams didn't explain why she quit

2

Jelena McWilliams didn’t explain why she quitCredit: Getty Images – Getty

What does his resignation mean?

His resignation could give President Joe Biden the opportunity to strengthen his influence over banking regulation as the Republican-nominated president will give way to a Democrat-nominated replacement.

Since Democrats hold the majority of the board and vice president, Martin Grunberg is expected to be the interim president, Democrats have more control over the decision-making process.

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We will start 2022 with storms and heavy rains https://columbus-chamber.org/we-will-start-2022-with-storms-and-heavy-rains/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 22:38:42 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/we-will-start-2022-with-storms-and-heavy-rains/ Gray and gloomy conditions dominated our Thursday; high afternoon temperatures only climbed until the upper mid-1940s in much of the tri-state. We had a high temperature of just 47C in Evansville earlier today, marking your coolest day in River City in over a week. As for the rest of the evening, cloud cover will likely […]]]>

Gray and gloomy conditions dominated our Thursday; high afternoon temperatures only climbed until the upper mid-1940s in much of the tri-state. We had a high temperature of just 47C in Evansville earlier today, marking your coolest day in River City in over a week. As for the rest of the evening, cloud cover will likely persist as temperatures remain in the mid-40s. We will probably be plunging to around 46 ° or so at some point tonight, but by the time we all wake up tomorrow morning, temperatures will have risen to the low zone of the 1950s.

We will start on the last day of 2021 under mostly cloudy skies. Despite cloud cover over the Lower Ohio Valley, temperatures will rise across the region. Southerly winds gusting up to 10 or even 15 mph will help propel temperatures into the mid-60s on Friday afternoon; we will reach a high temperature of 67 ° in Evansville on New Years Eve. However, tomorrow’s forecast will not focus on our rising temperatures, but on the threat of downpours, storms and potentially severe weather.

A core of low pressure on Friday evening followed quickly by the passage of a cold front on Saturday will generate periods of heavy rains and high winds. The latest model data indicates that we could see the first of the isolated rains reach parts of the three states around 6 p.m. Friday evening. However, the likelihood of severe weather conditions will last until later overnight – we may start to see stronger and potentially severe thunderstorms developing in parts of the tri-states as early as 9:00 p.m. or 10:00 p.m. on Friday. evening. The biggest threat from the storms on Friday and Saturday will be the destructive straight-line winds of over 60 mph; prolonged heavy rainfall will also pose a threat, leading to the possibility of significant flooding in places.

By the time it’s all said and done on Saturday night, some places across the tri-state could see more than 3 “and possibly 4” of total precipitation in just over 24 hours. The main timeline of potentially severe storms will occur between 10 p.m. on Friday and 6 p.m. on Saturday. Once the threat of severe weather subsides, temperatures will begin to drop rapidly. After seeing the 60s low early on Saturday, the mercury is expected to worsen; temperatures will drop again until the mid-1920s – we will start on January 2 with a low morning temperature of just 26 °.


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Book Review: A History of Monsanto and its Toxic Legacy https://columbus-chamber.org/book-review-a-history-of-monsanto-and-its-toxic-legacy/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 03:34:28 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/book-review-a-history-of-monsanto-and-its-toxic-legacy/ Monsanto Co’s Roundup for sale in Encinitas, Calif., June 2017. Photo: Reuters / Mike Blake / File Photo Monsanto’s fundamental strategy was to become a magic handmaiden of the industry rather than going directly to consumers. The product that made the business profitable was caffeine, starting production a few years after the plant opened in […]]]>

Monsanto Co’s Roundup for sale in Encinitas, Calif., June 2017. Photo: Reuters / Mike Blake / File Photo


  • Monsanto’s fundamental strategy was to become a magic handmaiden of the industry rather than going directly to consumers.
  • The product that made the business profitable was caffeine, starting production a few years after the plant opened in 1902 and selling primarily to Coca-Cola.
  • As the economy expanded into petrochemicals, the deleterious effects of Monsanto’s increasingly toxic line of chemicals: PCBs, DDT, 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T also grew. .
  • The list goes on, followed by disasters, contaminations and disputes brought by people with serious health problems.

When your main character is Monsanto, the former name of a St. Louis chemical company that, at least in some circles, is seen as evil incarnate (nickname: “Monsatan”), the Hollywood treatment requires a rowdy lawyer who exposes everything. Unfortunately, environmental history and epidemiology rarely proceed along such sharp narrative arcs.

Bartow J. Elmore’s book, Seed Money: Monsanto’s past and our food future, opens like a typical blockbuster. Corporate suits in dark SUVs pull up outside a small town courthouse in the heart of America. The case concerns a farmer who claims to have suffered a financial loss due to dicamba, a herbicide sold by Monsanto and the German chemicals company BASF, who is particularly prone to drift from field to field.

The Farmer’s Crusade lawyer claims the chemical was illegally sprayed on a neighbor’s crop, damaging his client’s peach trees. But then the tale quickly travels to San Francisco, where lawyers for a gardener attribute a cancer diagnosis to lifetime exposure to Roundup, Monsanto’s most popular brand herbicide. The plaintiff wins big and the multi-million dollar settlement soon results in more than 120,000 lawsuits.

The cast of Seed money soon swells, almost massively, with sketches from Monsanto’s founders and the main architects of its changing business model, as well as farmers, seed merchants, researchers and people who say their bodies were destroyed by a list without Steadily growing products sold by Monsanto, or its current owner, Bayer, which incorporated the company into its holdings in 2018.

Tracing the roots of the company, Elmore, who teaches environmental and business history at Ohio State University, attempts to squeeze the juiciest chunks out of a fairly dry corporate history. In the late 1800s, before founding Monsanto, John Queeny purchased drugs for large pharmaceutical wholesalers, including patented snake oil drugs, eventually to the Meyer Brothers Drug Company; he may have calmly accepted the news that a fire had ravaged his sulfuric acid plant the very day it opened, and the plant failure perhaps “led him to the saloon several mornings, where he swallowed nickel beers and sandwiches with his boss, Carl Meyer ”.

There, the author speculates, Queeny and another colleague devised Monsanto’s founding movement: to make artificial sweeteners, namely saccharin. Elmore notes the irony that from the start Monsanto apparently supported government regulation, even garnering support from Harvey Wiley, the so-called founding father of the United States Food and Drug Administration, and the rise in Monsanto’s power was based on the liberation of Americans from German chemical cartels, including Bayer.

Monsanto’s fundamental strategy was to become a magic handmaiden of the industry rather than going directly to consumers. The product that made the business profitable was caffeine, starting production a few years after the factory opened in 1902 and selling mainly to their “cash cow”, Coca-Cola (the subject of the first book by Elmore, Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism). As the economy expanded into petrochemicals, the deleterious effects of Monsanto’s increasingly toxic line of chemicals: PCB, DDT, 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T (the latter two being both herbicides and active ingredients in Agent Orange), the list goes on, followed by catastrophes, contaminations and disputes brought by people with serious health problems.

It is an incessant accumulation of algae blooms and skin lesions. Describing the remote manufacturing sites of Idaho and West Virginia, Elmore writes, “the bodies of these workers had stories to tell.” He sifts through the wreckage, deftly extracting vignettes from primary court documents, journals and scholarly journals.

The plot rarely deviates far from the course one would expect: Monsanto behaves abominably in pursuit of profit. In the late 1970s, for example, when company officials sensed that a controversy was brewing in West Virginia, they commissioned a study designed to refute the health concerns. Later in the 1990s, while searching for the genes of what would become the company’s next pivotal product, the researchers probed the heavily contaminated soil around a former Monsanto site. “Essentially,” Elmore writes, “the company was hoping to find a profitable innovation by harnessing its own pollution. “

Seed money hit its stride by documenting what is perhaps Monsanto’s best-known iteration in its phase of the “new era in American agriculture” that took shape in the 1990s under Robert B. Shapiro, its managing director at the time – someone who Elmore said should be a household name. Shapiro preached a wellness message and ushered in the ‘first commercial launch of genetically modified (GM) seeds for major staple crops,’ starting in 1996 with Bollgard cottonseed and quickly followed by soybeans and canola. .

“Today, whether you are a vegan eating tofu, a corn-fed beef enthusiast, or a high fructose drinker,” Elmore writes, “you have almost certainly swallowed grain containing DNA from it. ‘a successor to Shapiro raised for the first time in a Monsanto laboratory.

According to Elmore, Shapiro has made the company more like Microsoft, licensing genetically modified seeds tolerant to “Roundup Ready” herbicides like software. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, is still the most widely used herbicide, covering 90 percent of all corn and soybeans grown in the United States, and has been compared to wonder drugs like penicillin.

Roundup Ready seeds are now part of a patented system that allows farmers to spray the herbicide at will. Over time, however, weeds evolve and develop resistance to Roundup, and its overuse has undermined its relative effectiveness. Although it tried to distance itself from a legacy focused on making chemicals for industry, Monsanto found that, even with its genetically modified products, it still couldn’t completely part with its “relentless pursuit.” to sell more chemicals, ”Elmore writes. One of Monsanto’s last acts, before being bought out by Bayer, was to revive dicamba, an old-fashioned chemical and sort of booster to prolong the phenomenal profitability of the world’s best-selling herbicide. world.

In his thanks, Elmore writes that he has obtained permission to examine the company’s records. Suffice it to say, however, Seed money does not read like a sanctioned story. Nor does he sizzle with zeal for prosecution. There are journalistic touches; Elmore’s research takes him to many places (Brazil, for example) and he seems to meet many sources in person. But the leather of the shoe doesn’t always translate into cinematic action on the spot. The details accumulate in numerous footnotes, giving the book, strewn with multisyllabic jargon, a rather learned air.

With the Roundup litigation ongoing, Bayer has attempted to defend itself, in part, by arguing that science is on its side. The US Environmental Protection Agency and the European Chemicals Agency, among other regulatory agencies, have determined that the herbicide does not cause cancer. The World Health Organization, however, classifies it as a probable human carcinogen. Several juries have reached the same conclusion – Elmore acknowledges that jurors in a 2018 case “did not need compelling scientific evidence of the link between glyphosate and cancer”. On the contrary, in court, it seems that the most convincing story wins.

Seed money, of course, is the term used for an initial round of funding, and the book makes an implicit accusation of how research funding bends “at the behest of business.” Monsanto is also good at sowing doubt, by sponsoring research that undermines accusations about the dangers of its products.

Despite a subtitle promising to deliver a message on “our food future”, Seed money never quite achieves this result, instead focusing on the toxic legacy that fueled Monsanto’s transformation into an agriculture and biotech giant, and providing an in-depth chronicle of the ideology and context in which its ubiquitous chemistry was born.

Ultimately, Elmore writes, “While executives loved to talk about how the ‘new’ Monsanto was so different from the old, the truth was that the company’s future was still tied to its chemical origins. – to scavenging capitalism. “

“Roundup,” he continues, “derived from phosphate ore mined from ancient sea beds that dried up millions of years ago, produced half of the company’s revenue in 2001. Monsanto, in in other words, could never completely free himself from the chemical economy he helped create. “

Peter Andrey Smith is a freelance journalist. His stories have been featured in Science, STAT, the New York Times and Radiolab WNYC.

This article was originally published on Darkness.


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Obituary of Robert Krohn (1942 – 2021) – Toledo, OH https://columbus-chamber.org/obituary-of-robert-krohn-1942-2021-toledo-oh/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 09:35:26 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/obituary-of-robert-krohn-1942-2021-toledo-oh/ Robert “Bob” Krohn 09/21/1942 – 12/19/2021 As told by Joseph Krohn As I sit here thinking about what to write, I am inundated with memories of a life well lived. My father, a lover of chocolate covered cherries, Diet Pepsi, Manhattan’s (the drink), animals and NASCAR, passed away on December 19, 2021 at 10:35 p.m. […]]]>
Robert “Bob” Krohn

09/21/1942 – 12/19/2021

As told by Joseph Krohn

As I sit here thinking about what to write, I am inundated with memories of a life well lived. My father, a lover of chocolate covered cherries, Diet Pepsi, Manhattan’s (the drink), animals and NASCAR, passed away on December 19, 2021 at 10:35 p.m. Robert Krohn, aka Bob or Bobby, was born September 21, 1942 to Russell Krohn and Stella (Koczorowski) Krohn. Russell and Stella were fortunate to have seven children, five of whom succeeded my father, sisters Beverly Snyder, Melva Barboza, Marcella Doak and Rose Dunn; and his brother Russell Krohn.

Survivor is his younger brother, Marvin Krohn. My dad loved to travel, often taking trips with my mom, Darlene Krohn, in their conversion van or corvette. My father was an artist in both sculpture and jewelry, attending local art exhibitions and winning several awards. He was treasurer of the Toledo Area Sculptors Guild before his death. He was a member of the Ohio Air National Guard and was discharged on January 24, 1963. He attended night school, obtaining his certificate in industrial automotive technology in 1970. After 30 years of service, working with the production line robot-assisted, he retired from GM Powertrain but still busy with his art, gardening and various other hobbies. Among other occupations after his retirement, he worked for the Toledo Art Museum as a security guard. He enjoyed polka music, repairing cars, collecting coins (Kennedy half dollars in an old coffee can), playing solitaire on his phone, playing on his computer, going to the casino and playing cards, and so on. especially euchre with friends and fellow Shriners. He was a member of UAW Local 14, Collingwood Damascus Lodge # 643 as a 32nd degree Scottish Rite Mason, Zenobia Shrine and its Arab Patrol for which he held several positions including that of of captain general. He was a family man, raising six children (Kelly, Kim, Darlyn, James, Joseph and Geranda) and loved spending time with his grandchildren and great grandchildren and other family members. His work ethic was second to none, often working two jobs, six days a week (which he passed on to a few of his children). Thanks to my dad and his work ethic, my family had the chance to see things and travel, spending many hours in the luxury of a StarCraft conversion van looking for fun and excitement. We never went without anything and we are always taken care of. He was the rock of this family, often lending a hand or an ear to anyone in need. He will always be in our hearts and will be missed by those who knew him.

www.NewcomerToledo.com


Posted by The Blade on Dec 26, 2021.


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Ball State vs Georgia State predictions: Camellia Bowl pick and betting offers https://columbus-chamber.org/ball-state-vs-georgia-state-predictions-camellia-bowl-pick-and-betting-offers/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 14:01:00 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/ball-state-vs-georgia-state-predictions-camellia-bowl-pick-and-betting-offers/ Ball State’s Drew Plitt passes against Central Michigan in their game at Scheumann Stadium on Wednesday, November 17, 2021. (Imagin) Our college football betting expert offers his best tips and predictions for the Camellia Bowl game between Ball State and Georgia State scheduled for Christmas Day in Montgomery, Alabama. Mid-American Conference teams have struggled this […]]]>
Ball State’s Drew Plitt passes against Central Michigan in their game at Scheumann Stadium on Wednesday, November 17, 2021. (Imagin)

Our college football betting expert offers his best tips and predictions for the Camellia Bowl game between Ball State and Georgia State scheduled for Christmas Day in Montgomery, Alabama.

Mid-American Conference teams have struggled this bowl game season and the Cardinals aren’t about to end the MAC’s losing streak. Find out why below.

Predictions for the camellia bowl

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Choice of camellia bowls: the analysis

Ball State needed a 20-3 win over Buffalo in its regular season final to qualify for a bowl game.

The Cardinals are led offensively by senior quarterback Drew Plitt, who has 2,248 yards and 17 touchdowns this season with just five interceptions.

Plitt started steadily for three seasons, making 58 touchdowns and having been selected just 18 times. Ball State won its first bowl game in program history last season, beating San Jose State in the Arizona Bowl 34-13.

Georgia State has won six of its last seven games while finishing second in the Sun Belt Conference. The Panthers rank No.8 in FBS with 224.5 rushing yards per game behind the 1-2 punch from Tucker Gregg (899 yards, 9 TD) and Jamyest Williams (810 yards, 9 TD).

Quarterback Darren Grainger threw 16 touchdown passes and led the Sun Belt quarterbacks with 548 rushing yards. The Panthers beat Western Kentucky 39-21 last season in the Lending Tree Bowl.

MAC attacked

The Mid-American Conference was on display at this year’s boules games. Northern Illinois, Toledo, Eastern Michigan and Kent State have already lost their bowl games, all to unranked opponents.

The Cardinals are not at the same level as last year’s team that pulled off an upheaval. They lost six games and faced only one ranked opponent (Penn State, a 44-13 loss).

Georgia State gave Auburn, then No. 23, a bad assist in September, leading 24-12 at halftime before the Tigers rallied for a 34-24 victory. The Panthers took their heavy offense to high gear as the season wore on while keeping their opponents 21 points or less in six of their last seven games.

-110

State of Georgia to be covered -6

Climb the score

The Panthers have scored a total of 107 points while winning their last three games. They should have little trouble nicking a rushed Cardinals defense that allowed an average of 169.5 yards per game and 21 touchdowns.

The Cardinals will likely play some catch-up in this game. On the bright side, they have a seasoned quarterback who isn’t often chosen. Drew Plitt should be able to find enough holes in the Georgia State high school to get his team into the end zone multiple times.

It all adds up to a high scoring affair, enough to pass the 50.5 point line.

-110

Over 50.5 points in total

Win, you’re in the end zone

Jamyest Williams, a senior, has scored at least one touchdown in all of the Panthers’ wins. It’s a safe bet that he will find the end zone against a mediocre MAC team.

Williams’ production increased at the end of the regular season, despite sharing reporting with Tucker Gregg. He’s recorded straight 100-yard games, racking up 125 yards on 16 carries with two scores against Arkansas State and 108 yards on 15 carries and one touchdown against Troy.

Williams was a defensive back in South Carolina before moving to Georgia State. After playing a limited role in his first Panthers season, Williams has had a breakthrough season and he will be looking to end it on a high.

-105

Jamyest Williams scores a touchdown

Camellia bowl odds

Odds courtesy of BetMGM and accurate at time of posting. Subject to change.

Total number of points: 50.5 Team Propagated Silver line
Over -110 State of georgia -6 (-110) -250
Less than -110 Ball condition +6 (-110) +190

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Agricultural cooperatives announce support for victims of December tornadoes https://columbus-chamber.org/agricultural-cooperatives-announce-support-for-victims-of-december-tornadoes/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/agricultural-cooperatives-announce-support-for-victims-of-december-tornadoes/ LOUISVILLE, Ky., December 21, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Several of the nation’s leading agricultural co-ops are rallying to support customers, families, team members and communities affected by devastating tornadoes and inclement weather that swept across the southern and midwestern December 11. AgFirst, CoBank, Farm Credit East, Farm Credit Illinois, Farm Credit Mid-America, Farm Credit […]]]>

LOUISVILLE, Ky., December 21, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Several of the nation’s leading agricultural co-ops are rallying to support customers, families, team members and communities affected by devastating tornadoes and inclement weather that swept across the southern and midwestern December 11.

AgFirst, CoBank, Farm Credit East, Farm Credit Illinois, Farm Credit Mid-America, Farm Credit Services of America, Farm Credit of West ArkansasLand O’Lakes, Inc. and Rural 1st® have committed nearly $ 700,000 to national, state and local charities to help families and communities affected by these catastrophic events.

“The impact of this disaster is severe and is being felt at national, state and local levels,” said Derrick WagonerRegional President, CoBank. “CoBank and our partners have responded with a package of contributions benefiting a wide range of relief efforts. We hope our donations will help alleviate some of the most immediate suffering and support long-term recovery efforts. “

Recipients include the American Red Cross, Feeding America, Kentucky Agriculture Relief Fund, Kentucky Rural Electric Disaster Fund, Tennessee Farm Disaster Response Fund, Mayfield Tornado Relief Fund, and Rotary International in Dresden, Tennessee.

“As a federated cooperative system, our ownership network reaches communities across the country, including those devastated by the December storms. While natural disasters like this leave behind untold suffering and challenges, recovery efforts underscore what we do best as co-ops: coming together, “mentioned Brett BrugesLand O’Lakes, Inc. Executive Vice President and President, WinField United. “With cooperative partners, we are working to support our owners and their communities as they begin to rebuild what has been lost.”

The devastation from these storms spread to six states in the Midwest, leaving unprecedented damage. Residents of Kentucky and Tennessee were among the hardest hit by the weather. Co-ops continue to identify affected customers and work to understand how best to meet their immediate and long-term needs.

“We mourn our customers and our communities who have lost so much and are working diligently to find solutions to the obstacles ahead,” said Mark Barker, senior vice president of agricultural loans for Farm Credit Mid-America in Kentucky. “Alongside their communities, we have clients who have suffered significant losses of personal and business property. While we are still learning the extent of the damage and loss, Farm Credit Mid-America and our fellow co-ops are committed to being long-term partners in helping our clients get back on their feet.

As part of their contributions, many of these cooperatives also match individual contributions made by their employees to organizations like the Red Cross and the Salvation Army. In addition, CoBank will offer a $ 100,000 matching funds for its clients who donate to tornado relief efforts. Information on the matching fund will be provided directly to CoBank customers in the coming days.

About CoBank
CoBank is a 155 billion dollars cooperative bank serving vital industries across rural America. The bank provides commercial loans, leases, export finance, and other financial services to agribusinesses and rural electricity, water and communications providers in all 50 states. The bank also provides wholesale loans and other financial services to affiliated farm credit associations serving more than 75,000 farmers, ranchers and other rural borrowers in 23 states nationwide. CoBank is a member of the Farm Credit System, a nationwide network of retail banks and lending associations licensed to serve the borrowing needs of agriculture, rural infrastructure, and rural communities in the United States.

About Land O’Lakes
Land O’Lakes, Inc., one of the leading food and agri-food companies in the United States, is a member-owned cooperative with state-of-the-art operations that span the spectrum from agricultural production to consumer foods. With 2020 annual sales of $ 14 billionLand O’Lakes is one of the largest co-ops in the country, ranking 219 on the Fortune 500. Building on a heritage of over 100 years of operation, Land O’Lakes today operates some of the brands respected companies in the food and beverage industry, including Land O’Lakes Dairy Foods, Purina Animal Nutrition, WinField United and Truterra. The company operates in all 50 states and more than 60 countries. Land O’Lakes, Inc. is headquartered in Arden Hills, Minnesota.

About Farm Credit Mid-America
Farm Credit Mid-America is a financial services cooperative that has served the credit needs of farmers and rural residents across Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee for over a century. Supported by the strength of over $ 28.8 billion in assets, Farm Credit Mid-America provides loans for real estate, operations, equipment, housing and related services such as crop insurance and vehicle, equipment and construction leases. For more information call 1-800-444-FARM or visit www.e-farmcredit.com.

SOURCE Farm Credit Mid-America


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Take the stress out of major year-end purchases – Ohio Ag Net https://columbus-chamber.org/take-the-stress-out-of-major-year-end-purchases-ohio-ag-net/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 07:30:00 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/take-the-stress-out-of-major-year-end-purchases-ohio-ag-net/ By Matt Reese It doesn’t take long to do the big math – good yields and high prices made 2021 a strong financial year for many Ohio farms. Many land sales and farm auctions give farmers options for spending their money in 2021, but the more detailed calculations about those major buying decisions can get […]]]>

By Matt Reese

It doesn’t take long to do the big math – good yields and high prices made 2021 a strong financial year for many Ohio farms. Many land sales and farm auctions give farmers options for spending their money in 2021, but the more detailed calculations about those major buying decisions can get a bit trickier.

Melanie Strait-Bok, regional vice president of farm loans for Farm Credit Mid-America, strongly encourages careful thought with farm lenders before making hasty year-end decisions that impact a farm for many years. future.

“I know it’s not everyone’s favorite thing, but it has an incredible impact on operations when we can compare balance sheets to income tax returns and understand what’s really going on,” Strait-Bok said. . “The first thing we want to see from a farmer at the end of the year are updated inventory levels. We really need to dig into that balance sheet and say, ‘OK, what has changed since the period last year that we need to take into account and update the balance sheet’. Most people aren’t going to spend New Years Eve sitting at their desks, but I would say in the last week of December or at least the first or two days of January, you should take the time to sit down and update balance sheet items, especially those that have an impact on your working capital. These items could include the inventory of any grain in stock, silage, livestock, advance payments you have made, acres of wheat you may have. These numbers can change dramatically. Sit down and write them down at the end of the calendar year, then set that appointment with your lender on the calendar.

With a lender, it is then important to review all the details and objectives of the transaction to get a clear financial picture.

“When you think about the year-end date you have with your lender, it’s a really important time to sit down and say, ‘This is what happened in the last 12 months.’ It may only take an hour or two. It’s also good to share what you plan to do over the next 12 months. What could happen in the next year or two? What purchases do you want to make? You and your lender need to be on the same page about where your business is going and what your needs are. Get an accurate balance sheet so we can understand and see these changes from year to year and compare it to your tax return. We all know we don’t want to pay more taxes than necessary. Sometimes this tax return does not give us an accurate picture of what has happened in the past 12 months. Having that conversation to understand what happened, how it impacted the balance sheet, and then comparing it to the tax return, that’s how we get a really good picture of your financial situation. Then we can see what you want to do over the next 12 months and how it will impact your financial situation.

This careful examination of the farm’s financial condition is especially important before major year-end purchase decisions.

“If you have any idea that a property might be in the market, call your financial agent and get pre-approved so you have that peace of mind and take the stress out of trying to negotiate a price. ” she said. “What would be the maximum price you would be willing to offer?” If you buy this property, will it impact your purchase of the family farm that you know will be up for sale over the next 2 years? We need to make sure that you understand all the implications now for your future financial situation. It gives you a chance to sit down and say, “This is the number that I know is my cash. This is what will happen to my working capital, this is what my creditworthiness looks like and this is the maximum number that I am willing to invest in this property without having any implications in the years to come. ‘ It takes away some of the emotion when you actually bid at a live auction. Taking that emotion out and being able to know the number will really help your operation from a financial standpoint. By knowing these numbers, the stress is removed from the situation if you are contacted for a private sale before the end of the year.

Equipment purchases at the end of the year also benefit from this type of financial understanding.

“Do you really need this equipment or are you buying it just to avoid taxes? If the answer is you don’t need it, meet with your accountant to see if there are other ways to avoid paying taxes. If you have to finance this equipment, you might pay for it for the next 5 years just to avoid taxes in 1 year. What will you gain from having this piece of equipment? Will it make your operation more efficient? These answers will not appear in a balance sheet. It’s more about knowing the details of your operation. These are great questions to ask yourself, ”said Strait-Bok. “When you think about these purchases, it’s important to think about the short-term and long-term impacts of the decision. What will it keep you from doing in the next 2-5 years or make you more money over the next 2-5 years? ”


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State residents must have access to credit | Letters to the Editor https://columbus-chamber.org/state-residents-must-have-access-to-credit-letters-to-the-editor/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 06:45:00 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/state-residents-must-have-access-to-credit-letters-to-the-editor/ Over the weekend I read a comment in The New Mexican of Santa Fe In the state’s view, it lacked leadership when it came to regulating the New Mexico lending industry (“A lack of leadership to end the 175% interest rate in New Mexico). Mexico ”, Ringside Seat, December 13). While parts of the article […]]]>

Over the weekend I read a comment in The New Mexican of Santa Fe In the state’s view, it lacked leadership when it came to regulating the New Mexico lending industry (“A lack of leadership to end the 175% interest rate in New Mexico). Mexico ”, Ringside Seat, December 13). While parts of the article deserve real consideration, the crux of the matter is access to credit for the most vulnerable in our communities. It is generally a responsible part; However, I think there are some examples offered that require further consideration.

For example, while it is correct that 18 states have cap rates, only three actually have the hard cap of 36% that the article refers to. The other remaining states are flexible. For example, Ohio excludes payday lenders and title loans in Arizona. Such exemptions are not a problem for New Mexico, as it is well known that these predatory lenders are indeed banned in the state. The article touts the success of the Military Lending Act rate cap. Earlier this year, a National Foundation for Credit Counseling survey found that active service members were more than twice as likely to take out a cash advance or payday loan in 2020 than in 2019.

All New Mexicans need access to credit, and many don’t have a credit score or bank account for the kind of options many take for granted. Is the 36% rate cap the right way to protect consumers, or will it dry up credit for underserved communities? When they choose to address this issue, let’s make sure the state legislature is doing what is right for our state.

New Mexico African American Room

I salute Dr Dominick DellaSala’s wise words (“Forests Need Fire – Communities Don’t”, My View, December 12) in our local newspaper this Sunday. Now we can hear an expert account on climate change and forest management in which he questions the practices of managers in our Santa Fe National Forest. Carbon pollution from extensive logging and prescribed burning do not solve the problems of forest fires. He and his colleagues looked at a collection of 1,500 fires over a 40-year period, which showed that forests protected from logging burned with less intensity. Dr DellaSala concludes that we should not build more roads and cut down millions of trees that naturally store carbon, thus slowing climate change. I appreciate and share his vision of preserving our natural forests and “giving the next generation of trees, shrubs and flowering plants more time to regenerate”.

The December 8 edition of Pipeline and Gas Log had an article on the Permian Basin of New Mexico. According to major driller Conoco via the remarks of its executive vice president Tim Leach, “the cost of producing the Permian [of oil] is the lowest in the world at the moment. It costs less than $ 30 to produce a barrel of oil. This leaves plenty of room for companies to deal with the flaring and discharge of natural gas.

Gas is less lucrative than oil, so it is often released into the atmosphere or flared. However, with such a large profit margin, producers are now in a better position to flare gas. In the Permian in 2019, 293 million cubic feet were flared. That’s enough to heat homes in New Mexico for two years, just burnt down. In addition, this represents $ 1.2 billion of gasoline which would otherwise provide taxes and royalties. Lawmakers and the governor should stop polluting our air by bowing down to oil and gas interests. Flaring and gas evolution should stop. Complete stop.

Don’t insult New Jersey

I was very insulted by your opinion piece (“It’s time to fix Albuquerque before it’s too late,” Our View, December 14) in which you said New Mexico could become New Jersey of the desert. What would make you denigrate New Jersey? I am a former New Jersian. While New Jersey has its problems, in many ways – education for one – New Jersey is far superior to New Mexico. I even wonder if New Jersey has less crime than New Mexico. How about an apology and a promise never to insult another state for a joke? Shame on The New Mexican.


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Scott + Scott Lawyers LLP files https://columbus-chamber.org/scott-scott-lawyers-llp-files/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 23:07:39 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/scott-scott-lawyers-llp-files/ NEW YORK, December 16, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Scott + Scott Attorneys at Law LLP (“Scott + Scott”), an international shareholder and consumer rights litigation firm, has filed a securities class action lawsuit against Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (“Goldman Sachs”) and Morgan Stanley (“Morgan Stanley”), alleging violations of §§20A, 10 (b) and 20 (a) of […]]]>

NEW YORK, December 16, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Scott + Scott Attorneys at Law LLP (“Scott + Scott”), an international shareholder and consumer rights litigation firm, has filed a securities class action lawsuit against Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (“Goldman Sachs”) and Morgan Stanley (“Morgan Stanley”), alleging violations of §§20A, 10 (b) and 20 (a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act ”), 15 USC §§78t-1, 78j (b) and 78t (a), and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder, 17 CFR §240.10b- 5. If you purchased common shares of Baidu, Inc. (“Baidu” or the “Company”) (NASDAQ: BIDU) between March 22, 2021 and March 29, 2021 inclusive (the “Class Period”) and you have suffered significant losses, realized or unrealized, we encourage you to contact Scott + Scott’s attorney Jonathan Zimmerman at (888) 398-9312 for more information.

Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley are global financial services institutions that have served as prime brokers for Archegos Capital Management (“Archegos”), a family office with $ 10 billion under management, helping Archegos complete transactions and lending capital to Archegos. in the form of a margin loan.

According to the Complaint, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley sold a large amount of Baidu shares during the Class Period while in possession of material and non-public information about Archegos and its need to liquidate its position in the Company entirely. due to the pressure of margin calls. As a result of these sales, the defendants Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley avoided billions of losses combined.

Lead Applicant Deadline

The deadline for the Lead Complainant in this action is February 14, 2022. Any member of the proposed Class may request to serve as the Lead Complainant through any lawyer of their choice, or may elect to do nothing and remain a member of the proposed Group. The case is pending in the Southern District of New York under file number 1: 21-cv-10791.

What you can do

If you bought Baidu common shares during the Class Period, or if you have any questions regarding this notice or your legal rights, we encourage you to contact attorney Jonathan Zimmerman at (888) 398-9312 or jzimmerman@scott-scott.com.

About Scott + Scott

Scott + Scott has extensive experience in pursuing major securities, antitrust and consumer rights actions across the United States. The firm represents pension funds, foundations, individuals and other entities around the world with offices in New York, London, Amsterdam, Connecticut, California, Virginia and Ohio.

It can be thought of as a lawyer ad.

CONTACT:
Jonathan zimmerman
Scott + Scott Lawyers LLP
230 Park Avenue, 17th Floor, New York, NY 10169-1820
(888) 398-9312
jzimmerman@scott-scott.com


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Learning Grove and Brighton Center among nonprofits to receive latest First Financial Bank grants https://columbus-chamber.org/learning-grove-and-brighton-center-among-nonprofits-to-receive-latest-first-financial-bank-grants/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 05:43:30 +0000 https://columbus-chamber.org/learning-grove-and-brighton-center-among-nonprofits-to-receive-latest-first-financial-bank-grants/ Learning Grove and Brighton Center are among 23 organizations in Greater Cincinnati to have received $ 155,000 in grants from the First Financial Bank and the First Financial Foundation. The grants are part of First Financial’s annual 2021 grants campaign that benefits more than 60 organizations in its four states, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Illinois, […]]]>

Learning Grove and Brighton Center are among 23 organizations in Greater Cincinnati to have received $ 155,000 in grants from the First Financial Bank and the First Financial Foundation.

The grants are part of First Financial’s annual 2021 grants campaign that benefits more than 60 organizations in its four states, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Illinois, that improve and develop the communities in which the bank operates.

First Financial presented grants to 23 community organizations in Northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati as part of its 2021 grant campaign. (FFB Photo)

“This campaign is an outstanding example of our intention to be a positive influence and help our customers and communities thrive,” said Archie Brown, President and CEO of First Financial Bank. “Our support for these organizations will enhance our cities and towns and help our neighbors grow and prosper. “

The 2021 annual grant campaign places particular emphasis on low-income communities, with funding priorities in neighborhood development, workforce development and education, as well as culture and communities. arts.

First Financial announced grants for workforce development and education at the Brighton Center; Learning grove; Cincinnati Architectural Foundation; Cornerstone tenant net worth; Easterseals TriState; Young company of OKI partners; By Scholas; Santa Maria Community Services; Saint-Aloysius Orphanage; the bond project; Inspirational studios; and Hope House Rescue Mission.

“Funding for Learning Grove is critical to the continued success of the NKY College & Career Connector services,” said Shannon Starkey-Taylor, CEO of Learning Grove. “This program has effectively bridged the gap between business, industry and schools to create industry-specific talent pools for the benefit of the entire region. “

The 2021 annual grant campaign is one of the bank’s many initiatives to deliver on its strategic intention to integrate into the communities it serves. Earlier this year, First Financial Bank received the highest overall rating from the Federal Reserve Board for its performance under the Community Reinvestment Act in meeting the credit needs of individuals and businesses in its communities. The highest rating comes after a broad assessment of First Financial’s lending, investment and service levels from 2017 to 2020, specifically benefiting clients who meet income criteria or reside in low or low income census tracts. moderate.

First financial bank


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